Jerry Wilson wipes sweat from his face while wearing a noose around his neck at an Aug. 20 protest against Silent Sam, a Confederate monument on UNC-Chapel Hill's campus. His friend, Cortland Gilliam, joined him in this gesture. They both vowed to wear these nooses whenever they were on campus until the statue was taken down. This was intended to represent the oppression and white supremacy they feel the statue represents. The pair did not have to wear the nooses long, as protestors forcefully tore down the statue only a few hours later at 9:20 p.m. on August 20, 2018. 

Wilson and Gilliam put the nooses back on following Chancellor Carol Folt and the Board of Trustees' Dec. 3 proposal to establish a University History and Education center to house Silent Sam.  

Why are graduate students often at the center of campus protests?

Graduate students have been at the helm of campus protests at UNC since the 1960s, from George Vlasits, an anti-Vietnam War protester in the 1960s, to Maya Little, a current UNC graduate student of history who faced Honor Court and criminal charges for staining Silent Sam with red ink and her own blood last April. We took a closer look at why that is.


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Elizabeth Gardner, owner of Krave in Carrboro, serves a customer the bar’s signature Krush drink. Krush is made with kava and kratom plants, creating an earthy taste with relaxing effects.

Krave Bar is creating community in Carrboro

Krave is a bar that serves indigenous roots and teas located at 105 W. Main St. in Carrboro next to Club Nova Thrift Shop. Customers keep coming back for the relaxed and friendly atmosphere and drinks, featuring both kava and kratom plants. 


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Threats targeting UNC students take new meaning with connection to actual violence

The online account most involved in posting about UNC students is also the account most frequently interacted with by Robert Bowers, the alleged murderer of 11 people in a Pittsburgh synagogue last month. This discovery has made the constant influx of digital death threats and online harassment seem that much more real to the local activists on the receiving end.  “White supremacists are being radicalized online in the same way that ISIS radicalizes recruits,” said Heidi Beirich, director of the SPLC’s Intelligence Project.


Ramishah Maruf

Column: Meet your opinion editor

"The opinion page is the center of the Chapel Hill community, offering a place for discussions on topics that directly affect us. It’s the soul of the paper and the community. Running that is a responsibility that Elisa Kadackal, our new assistant opinion editor, and I hold seriously."