Educators carry signs through Bicentennial Plaza during the rally for education on May 16 in Raleigh.

N.C. educators want you to know their protest was about more than just pay

Educators and supporters from across the state assembled in Raleigh on Wednesday for a March for Students and Rally for Respect. 

Due to the massive expected teacher absences, dozens of school districts across the state closed on May 16, leaving about 68 percent of North Carolina’s public school students out of class for the day. 

Their absence from work was certainly noted, but educators wanted their appeals to N.C. legislators to be just as affecting. A few shared their signs, their stories and their desired results of the rally with us.


Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools

Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools is one of two public schools systems in Orange County. The system is run by the CHCCS Board of Education, which is comprised of seven elected officials who hold four-year terms. Under the board is the superintendent. The current superintendent is Tom Forcella.

The district includes 11 elementary schools, four middle schools, four high schools, a middle college with Durham Technical Community College and a school for children at UNC Hospitals. These schools serve more than 12,000 students across Orange County.

Learn more about the district's Board of Education here

Browse board meeting agendas and videos here

The Daily Tar Heel tags stories to make it easier for you to find our more about topics you care about. Consider it a Wikipedia for all things UNC.


Photo courtesy of Chapel Hill Public Library, from their book "Courage in the Moment. The Civil Rights Struggle 1961-1964" photographed by Jim Wallace. Protestors had to agree to practice nonviolent resistance by neither assisting or resisting arrest, here the demonstrators are lying on Franklin Street, according to the book. 

Gone but not forgotten: Chapel Hill School District's slow start to desegregation

The Brown v. the Board of Education Supreme Court decision was made in 1954, but the Chapel Hill school board didn’t start desegregating schools until 1960, and desegregation wasn’t complete in Chapel Hill until the summer of 1966.  “Even in progressive Chapel Hill and Carrboro, it wasn’t smooth and some very hurtful things happened,” said Mia Burroughs, a member of the Orange County Board of Commissioners.


Students at East Chapel Hill High School spend time outside after school is let out. Both Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools and Orange County Schools are facing a funding crisis due to proposed legislation that would reduce the size of elementary school classes.

Orange County Schools struggle to cap class size for NC legislation

North Carolina school districts are facing a funding crisis. In Orange County, voters approved a $120 million-dollar bond in November 2016 to renovate several school buildings, but additional funding for teachers and new classrooms will be needed to comply with a proposed reduction in class sizes for kindergarten through third grade.