The Daily Tar Heel

Serving the students and the University community since 1893

Wednesday June 29th

Sexual Assault

In December 2012, two UNC female victims of sexual assault spoke up about what they said was a deeply rooted problem with the University’s handling of sexual misconduct — one that they said was inappropriate, time-consuming and traumatic. Those allegations drove three current students, one former student and one former administrator to file a complaint against the University with the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights, alleging that UNC facilitated a hostile environment for victims reporting sexual assault. 

To help bring the University into compliance with the Department of Education’s “Dear Colleague” letter, the University has also hired Ew Quimbaya-Winship to serve as UNC’s Deputy Title IX Officer, or student complaint coordinator, starting March 11, 2013.

The University's Sexual Assault Task Force convenes for the first time in May 2013 to address changing the University's misconduct policies related to sexual assault.

On Aug. 28, 2014, the University released its new policy on discrimination, harassment and related misconduct

General Script



On May 3, 2022, students at the North Carolina School of Science and Math, in Durham, NC, sit and stand in silent protest of title IX cases and assault accusations. Students say these cases have resulted in no action by NCSSM administration.

Students at NCSSM protest how the school handles sexual assault cases

Silent protesters gathered at the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics with signs expressing their dissatisfaction with how school leaders have handled sexual assault cases on Tuesday.  The students listed their concerns and demands in an open letter to the NCSSM administration. The letter’s main grievances revolve around how the school handles reports of sexual assault and the current Title IX process, as well as how the school handles suicide attempts. Before Tuesday's protest, the students held a silent walkout on April 25. The leaders of the movement met with the administration before and after the event to discuss their concerns.

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The Old Well pictured on Oct. 17, 2021.

Farewell Column: UNC doesn’t protect survivors of sexual assault. I know because I am one.

"And I do represent Carolina. I represent the one in three women that are sexually assaulted on this campus. I represent the intelligent young women who come into this institution to study and accomplish great work, only to be exorcized of all morale, their diplomas inked with pain and fear. I also represent the lucky ones; the women who barely come out of that pain alive."

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DTH Photo Illustration depicting a person handing over 15 file folders.

UNC released sexual assault records — what happens next?

The University released the records of students found responsible for violating UNC's sexual assault policy Thursday, four years after The Daily Tar Heel and other news organizations requested them in 2016.  UNC provided a total of 15 records to fulfill the request. Clery Act data shows that since 2007, there have been over 200 reported cases of sex offenses at the University. Here is what the 15 records UNC released mean now that the lawsuit has concluded, what the data shows and what the DTH plans to do next to investigate sexual assault on campus. 

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'It’s not on us': From UNC to the courts, restraining order enforcement raises concerns

Both the North Carolina court system and UNC offer differing forms of no-contact orders — commonly called "restraining orders" — to victims of harassment, stalking, abuse or assault when they seek protection from their perpetrators. While each type of no-contact order varies by degree of enforcement and consequences, they all establish, on paper, measures prohibiting contact between involved individuals. But in reality, many victims have found that enforcement of these protective measures can fall on their shoulders alone, leaving them no more sense of protection than they felt before seeking official action. 

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Op-ed: Loud words, silent university

"Words have consequences, and events like the IFC speaker impact our community in immeasurable ways. These words are reflective of a broader culture of violence and oppression — they normalize violent actions in our community. We are righteously outraged at this behavior by the IFC. The system must be held responsible and face consequences."

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DTH Photo Illustration adapted from original DTH photograph by Hugh Morton in 1981.

Interfraternity Council guest speaker sparks controversy for alleged misogynistic comments

On Feb. 16, UNC’s Interfraternity Council hosted an event addressing personal development and mental health that has since been criticized by student leaders as offensive, misogynistic and otherwise problematic. Keynote speaker David Hagan described his speech as "intentionally blunt, graphic and filled with profanity," designed that way to resonate with young men. But Memorial Hall staff complained the speech made them uncomfortable, and some student leaders are still pressing for more public accountability from the IFC, asking the council to apologize for the event and commit to violence prevention training.

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