UNC-CHAPEL HILL


11/19/2019 2:51am

The Old Well, a popular UNC monument, pictured on Wednesday, April 19, 2017. 

'Blistering': UNC faces fines after federal safety, crime reporting violations

Nearly seven years after its investigation began, the U.S. Department of Education stated in a final program review report that UNC acted in violation of federal laws on campus safety and crime information throughout the department's review period while demonstrating a lack of administrative capability that “remains a matter of serious concern for the department.” Clery Act expert S. Daniel Carter told The Daily Tar Heel that the University is "certainly looking at six figures" in federal fines, and he called the department's description of UNC's administrative issues “one of the most blistering I’ve read in many years."


10/22/2019 12:15am

Mold growing on a vent in Granville Towers on Friday, Oct. 11, 2019. Residents have recently discovered mold in Granville Towers, forcing the Granville administration to relocate some residents to area hotels.

Granville Towers residents aren't the only UNC students dealing with mold

Carolina Housing received over 400 reports of mold in residence hall rooms between August 2018 and May 2019. Some students living in rooms with mold have complained about the University's response to the issue — especially as it was recently announced that Granville Towers residents will be relocated to nearby hotels as the mold in their rooms is cleaned. 


10/20/2019 6:52pm

(From left) Valerie P. Foushee, Graig Meyer and Verla Insko speak to the audience at Orange County's Democratic Party's election party at Might as Well in Chapel Hill in November 2018. 

Column: Addressing campus sexual assault

Graig Meyer, the state representative for House District 50 covering portions of Orange and Durham counties, discusses campus sexual assault.


10/19/2019 12:28am

North Carolina Speaker of the House Tim Moore, left, confers with President Pro Tempore Phil Berger in the Senate chambers during a special session of the North Carolina General Assembly on Friday, Dec. 16, 2016 at the Legislative Building in Raleigh, N.C. (Ethan Hyman/Raleigh News & Observer/TNS)

We looked into rumors that N.C. Speaker Tim Moore is going for UNC-System President

After interim UNC-System President Bill Roper said he will not seek to serve in his role in a permanent capacity, the search for a new system president became even more uncertain. Though the names of candidates have not been released, one controversial public figure has been the topic of recent rumors: Tim Moore.  Moore, the speaker of the N.C. House of Representatives, has made his name by supporting fiscal prudence and controversial moves such as HB2. Some say Moore would be a poor leader for the UNC System given his history in the General Assembly, while others argue that he could be a viable candidate. 


10/17/2019 3:45am

A SpotterEDU device sits at the front of the room in Hanes 117 as a student writes on the blackboard underneath on Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2019.

How UNC got the tech to track men's basketball, football players' class attendance

Emails and financial agreements received by the DTH through multiple public records requests reveal details of the lead-up to and implementation at UNC of SpotterEDU. The technology, developed and operated by a Chicago-based consulting firm, tracks the class attendance of student-athletes through beacon devices with an automatic Bluetooth connection to their smartphones.  Early last month, the DTH reported the existence of the new program at UNC. While the University declined at the time to state which sports it is using the new technology for, new documents suggest that SpotterEDU has been applied only to select players from the football and men's basketball teams.


10/8/2019 10:05pm

CH population change graphic-01.png

Chapel Hill’s population growth dropped off in the last decade. Is it a concern?

The Town of Chapel Hill's population is decreasing, despite popular assumptions. In fact, growth in this decade so far has been the slowest the town has seen since the 1970s. While this may sound alarming, it's more complicated than that. The rising cost of living has caused people to move to places right outside of Chapel Hill and Orange County, but this poses additional questions for the future of development and growth in Chapel Hill. How will the town expand, and how will they get people to stay?