Suzanne Blake

Articles

DTH PHOTO ILLUSTRATION

Healing in the wake of emotionally abusive college relationships

Accusations, manipulation and threats of suicide — a once-healthy relationship slowly becomes a nightmare. While there may be no bruises, victims often endure the behavior until they lose themselves. For many college students, it can be hard to overcome emotional abuse when they have to exist on the same campus. Two UNC students explain how they live, study and heal in the aftermath of their abusive relationships and what resources are available to those who are experiencing emotional abuse. 


Sophomore Ryker Smith, chemistry major, in front of the Morehead-Patterson Bell Tower on Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019. Smith is one of the founding fathers of the Delta Chi fraternity at UNC and a member of the LGBTQ community. Smith says that in his experiences with Greek life he has not experienced homophobia and that "he loves all of his brothers and all of his brothers love him."

Gay and Greek: LGBTQ+ students make homes in fraternities and sororities

There are two spheres on college campuses that have been, for the most part, pitted against each other in cinematic depictions and social media, seeming to operate in two separate realms of possibility. But being a part of Greek life as a member of the LGBTQ+ community is neither impossible nor discouraged.  UNC students share their experiences participating in Greek life while also being openly gay, which is still not without its challenges. But like many things, young people are changing the way the collegiate experience looks today.


Illustration by Haley Hodges. Students at UNC and at campuses across the country have fallen prey to ghosting, which involves sudden and total disappearance from a relationship. 

It's ghost or be ghosted: UNC students tell us about this dating disappearing act

You probably know about the dating trend called ghosting, common on college campuses with the widespread accessibility and anonymity of digital communication. One day, you think you've met your soulmate, and the next day they're dodging all communication. "I think it’s easier to see people as numbers rather than real people," one student said. "And so, it’s easier to just turn on a switch to avoid them forever than actually talk to them about, ‘Hey, this was cool, but I don’t really want to talk to you anymore.’” 


Eleanor Murray, a first-year public policy and global studies major, at the James A. Taylor Building, where Counseling and Psychological Services is located, on Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2019.  "As someone who did not realize I had mental health issues, it was helpful and resourceful and I felt supported while trying to find a therapist," Murray says of her experience with CAPS. Murray would recommend CAPS and likes the multiple treatment options offered at CAPS.

Does CAPS' referral system work?

Student experiences at Counseling and Psychological Services at UNC have been generally positive, but there is one complaint: They want more sessions. CAPS provides students six sessions before referring them to treatment elsewhere and many students say it's not enough. Read CAPS' side of the story.



Media

Different speakers took the stage during the May 14 rally for the North Carolina Poor People's Campaign in Raleigh.

Different speakers took the stage during the May 14 rally for the North Carolina Poor People's Campaign in Raleigh.


Protestors with the North Carolina Poor People's Campaign line up in downtown Raleigh.

Protestors with the North Carolina Poor People's Campaign line up in downtown Raleigh.


A protestor holds a sign stating "Everybody's Got a Right To Live" during the May 14 rally in Raleigh.

A protestor holds a sign stating "Everybody's Got a Right To Live" during the May 14 rally in Raleigh.


The Raging Grannies take the stage on May 14 during a rally with the North Carolina Poor People's Campaign.

The Raging Grannies take the stage on May 14 during a rally with the North Carolina Poor People's Campaign.


A sign language interpreter translates a speaker's words during the North Carolina Poor People's Campaign's protest on May 14.

A sign language interpreter translates a speaker's words during the North Carolina Poor People's Campaign's protest on May 14.


North Carolina Poor People's Campaign staged a protest in downtown Raleigh on May 14. 

North Carolina Poor People's Campaign staged a protest in downtown Raleigh on May 14. 


 North Carolina Poor People's Campaign staged a protest in downtown Raleigh on May 14.  

 North Carolina Poor People's Campaign staged a protest in downtown Raleigh on May 14.