Myah Ward

Articles

Students, faculty, and community members gathered on Franklin Street to protest the University's proposal to spend $5.3 million, in addition to $800,000 annually, on a new on-campus building housing Silent Sam. 

Franklin Street filled with demonstrators opposing University's Silent Sam proposal

Traffic was stopped in all directions as demonstrators marched through both lanes of Franklin Street on Monday night. Demonstrators leading the way held a large sign that read, "Put it up. We'll tear it down. Anti-racists run this town." The protest was in response to the proposal by Chancellor Carol Folt and the UNC Board of Trustees to create a $5.3 million "History and Education Center," a freestanding single-use building, to house the Confederate Silent Sam monument on the UNC Odum Village site. 


UNC Chancellor Carol Folt walks with Mark Merritt, vice chancellor and general council of UNC, through the Gaylord Opryland Resort & Conference Center in Nashville, Tenn. during a lunch break Aug. 16, 2017.

Folt, McCracken receive dozens of emails and voicemails after toppling of Silent Sam

Following a public records request by the DTH for communications to the Chancellor's Office on Aug. 20 and 21, the University released 18 emails, one text and approximately 150 voicemails. The DTH has also received 11 emails sent to UNC Police Chief Jeff McCracken.  Many of those who contacted the chancellor were upset about the events that took place on Aug. 20, and revoked their support of the University -- emotionally, physically and monetarily. Others questioned the state of the University, the community and worried over what would happen next. 


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Updated: UNC releases arrest information from Saturday's Silent Sam rally

“Until the school moves Silent Sam and the pedestal off campus, this is going to keep happening."  Another clash between two groups of demonstrators and police erupted on Saturday, adding to the mounting number of arrests over the fallen statue. Students, Confederate demonstrators and police struggled to have their voices heard as the protest escalated. From flags to food, each side fought for their beliefs. Certainly the Silent Sam issue is no more resolved than when the statue came down before LDOC 2018, but no matter what side you're on, everyone has a right to be safe. 


On Aug. 30, pro-Silent Sam demonstrators brought flowers and waved Confederate flags as part of a twilight service to commemorate the toppled statue. Directly beside this, those against the fallen monument held a dance party to celebrate. As twilight service goers left UNC's campus, police used a pepper fogger to disperse the crowd. 

Number of protesters arrested at Silent Sam since Aug. 20 rises to 17

Many in the Chapel Hill community feared Thursday night’s Silent Sam demonstration would turn to violence following Chancellor Carol Folt’s statement urging students to stay away from McCorkle Place. While the demonstration began peacefully, the night finished with three arrests, making a total of 17 Silent Sam-related arrests in less than two weeks, said UNC Media Relations manager Carly Miller in a statement. 



Media

Students and community members walked from Silent Sam to the Peace and Justice plaza Wednesday to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.'s death. 

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Students and community members walked from Silent Sam to the Peace and Justice plaza Wednesday to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.'s death. 


The Daily Tar Heel v. UNC hearing today had lawyers on both sides present their arguments. No resolution was made. 

The Daily Tar Heel v. UNC hearing today had lawyers on both sides present their arguments. No resolution was made.