Supporters of newly elected NC Supreme Court Associate Justice Anita Earls anticipate her arrival at the election night party for the Democratic party on Tuesday, Nov. 6 at the Democratic Headquarters in Raleigh.

Former political science professor discusses midterm results

This year, James Stimson, a Raymond Dawson Distinguished Bicentennial Professor of Political Science, retired after 21 years of service to the UNC Department of Political Science. He sat down with The Daily Tar Heel to discuss Tuesday's results.


Midterm Elections 2014

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N.C. Supreme Court Associate Justice-Elect Anita Earls delivers her acceptance speech at the election night party for the Democratic Party on Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018 at the N.C. Democratic headquarters in Raleigh. 

Anita Earls declares victory in race for N.C. Supreme Court

Earls previously worked as an attorney and civil rights advocate for 30 years. She founded the Southern Coalition for Social Justice, worked in the U.S. Department of Justice during the Clinton administration and worked on the U.S. Supreme Court case Covington v. North Carolina, in which the Supreme Court decided North Carolina's legislative districts to be unconstitutional gerrymandering. 


English and religious studies major Josh Pontillo poses for a picture after casting his vote at the Chapel of the Cross church at 304 E. Franklin St. on Oct. 23, 2018. The Chapel of the Cross severs as an early voter location close to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's campus.

Don't let voter fatigue catch you in the ballot box today, Orange County

Ever heard of "choice fatigue?" Well, if you're a voter this season, you might be catching it. This year's ballot is packed with decisions to make, including the six constitutional amendments and 16 races in which candidates are running.  As voters parse through the issues, the danger of waning attention span means that fewer votes make a swing vote more impactful. Some also say that placing important issues at the end of the ballot rigs the vote in favor of whichever party wants a lack of scrutiny on the final items. But how much of this could actually sway the 2018 election?