PUBLIC SAFETY


11/3/2019 10:21pm

A pro-Confederate protester shakes hands with UNC Police officer Timothy Tickle after Tickle explained to protesters the boundaries of UNC's campus on March, 16, 2019.The pro-Confederate group then left campus. Photo courtesy of Daniel Hosterman.

Months after controversy fueled its formation, UNC's safety commission faces questions

Campus Safety Commission meetings have been in session over the last two months to give students, faculty and staff the opportunity to discuss their concerns with being safe on campus. Since it convened it April, there have been 13 listening sessions with some being geared toward specific communities on campus.  But while the premise of bringing together stakeholders from the University together seems like a step in the right direction, some have said the goal is undermined by poor publicity and attendance. 


9/24/2019 10:26pm

Interim Chancellor Kevin Guskiewicz hears from the Chancellor's Advisory Committee in the conference room of South Building in Chapel Hill on Tuesday, Sept. 24, 2019.

Guskiewicz workshops Alert Carolina after crimes rattle students

A rape, attempted break-in and report of sexual harassment outside Davis Library have recently instilled fears within UNC students. With suspects at large in all three crimes, interim Chancellor Guskiewicz sat down with an advisory committee where they brainstormed ways to improve Alert Carolina and ultimately, reestablish a sense of safety on campus. 


8/25/2019 10:11pm

An emergency call station sits outside of Hanes Art Center on Aug. 25, 2019.

Have campus blue light call boxes outlived their usefulness?

Other universities in the country have taken out call boxes because mobile phones have made them obsolete. What about UNC? Despite the fact that the investment, which totals over $1 million dollars and 300 boxes at this point, has been deemed both practically and cost-ineffective by many law enforcement professionals, students on campus feel they give peace of mind.  While apps and mobile devices, which are almost always equipped with sophisticated tracking devices, seem to be the more accessible and convenient option for emergency situations, UNC Public Safety spokespersons have said there are no plans to remove the boxes. The project, which has spanned over 30 years on UNC's campus, has been used more successfully than some other schools, which removed boxes after years of nonuse.