The Daily Tar Heel

Serving the students and the University community since 1893

Tuesday August 9th

Student Life


DTH Photo Illustration. Members of UNC’s chapter of the environmental honors fraternity Epsilon Eta announced their decision to abolished the group after former members spoke out about its role in fostering white supremacy. The post read, “As a historically exclusive and majority-white institution with semblances of Greek life, we have contributed to the preservation of white supremacy on UNC-Chapel Hill’s campus. Our actions have marginalized and silenced BIPOC voices. To address these injustices, we view abolition as the most direct course of action to dismantle white supremacy.”

'Not reformable': Members of UNC Epsilon Eta abolish the honors fraternity

Members of UNC’s chapter of the environmental honors fraternity Epsilon Eta announced the abolition of the group in an Instagram post on Sept. 2 after former members called out the fraternity for its role in upholding a space rooted in white supremacy. “As a historically exclusive and majority-white institution with semblances of Greek life, we have contributed to the preservation of white supremacy on UNC-Chapel Hill’s campus," the post said. The letter and abolition of the group has sparked a conversation among UNC students and within Ep Eta’s own former membership group. “It needs to be the act of abolishing it that shows that we don't support those values,” former Ep Eta member Michael Byrd said.

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The Suite Life of Gum Box: First-year suitemate band optimistic despite move back home

Just weeks after they arrived, the members of Gum Box — along with thousands of other students — were moving off campus again. Instead of having impromptu jam sessions in their hallway or doing homework to the sound of a saxophone solo, the group is now facing a semester of Zoom calls and carefully planned recording meet-ups. “We’re all super stoked about the prospect of creating some original content together,” guitarist Harrington Shaw said. The band members are spread from Wilmington to Apex, but they’re prepared for the challenges of distance. In some ways, the distance could even have its benefits. The band is making plans to meet for its first recording session, in preparation for its first livestream performance.

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Sophomore Tamsin Engel brings a suitcase into Kenan Residence Hall for move-in on Wednesday, Aug. 5, 2020.

‘You don’t walk towards a red flag’: Students debate returning to campus

Amid a global pandemic, students wondered if returning to campus is worth the risk. Sophomore Madison Wommack considered the financial strain of returning as well as the potential risks of returning to campus, since a family works at a hospital. Sophomore Jolie Koonce decided to cancel her housing contract after learning that housing refunds were not guaranteed. Clay Morris considered the dangers returning to campus posed for the larger Chapel Hill community.  First-year Savannah Pless had to weigh attempting to have as normal of a typical first-year experience as possible, with the financial costs. 

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Maya Tadross stands outside Koury Residence Hall. Photo courtesy of Tadross.

'These are our lives on the line': Immunocompromised students consider fall return to UNC

According to the CDC, people of any age with underlying medical conditions such as diabetes, obesity or moderate-to-severe asthma, as well as people who are immunocompromised, may be at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19.  For many UNC students with pre-existing medical conditions, the decision to return to the University in August is quickly turning into a matter of life and death.

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Screenshot from the virtually-held Campus Safety Commission meeting on Wednesday, July 1, 2020 to discuss concerns about returning to campus regarding COVID-19.

Campus Safety Commission discusses community standards and rising COVID-19 cases

With a little more than a month left before the fall semester is set to begin, critical questions about the return to on-campus operations remain.  The Campus Safety Commission met Wednesday to discuss some of these concerns, including implementation of community standards, the current rate of COVID-19 cases and what could trigger potential “off-ramps” to send students home. 

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