Pine Knolls is a historically Black neighborhood just west of Merritt Mill Road, where UNC provided housing for some janitorial staff and subsidies for other Black workers facing postwar hardship.

'A struggle and a conflict': The history and future of Pine Knolls

Pine Knolls is a community that has struggled with self-preservation in the past, and today, that self-preservation is still uncertain.


The OC Report

Welcome to the OC Report from The Daily Tar Heel. The OC Report (for Orange County and Our Communities) is aimed at full-time residents of Chapel Hill, Carrboro and Hillsborough. We invite you to be part of this news coverage, by sending in community columns, texting us the questions you want answered (Text OCREPORT to 919-237-2123), coming to live gatherings and signing up for the OC Report newsletter.

You can also help us expand. We've got big plans, but we need the help of our readers to pay for their news. Here's what could be possible.

  • At $1,000 per month from the community, we'll provide editor and reporter resources for a weekly email newsletter and expanded web presence for news and community op-eds/letters to the editor. This would include monthly gatherings.
  • At $3,000 per month, the weekly newsletter PLUS two-page section added to the printed  paper and delivered to 197 boxes across the county. Donors benefits would include the page PDFs emailed to them in a special email.
  • For $5,000, we could hire of a team of two students to work full-time on local coverage throughout the summer break. That's $250/week for 10 weeks.
  • An additional $2,000/month would allow us to hire a part-time adviser to improve the student training and institutional memory.

Go to startthepresses.org today to help us build the OC Report into what Our Communities deserve.

The Daily Tar Heel tags stories to make it easier for you to find our more about topics you care about. Consider it a Wikipedia for all things UNC.


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Where are the coronavirus cases in North Carolina?

There are 2585 reported cases of COVID-19, also known as coronavirus, in North Carolina according to the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services as of 11:00 a.m. on Sunday. North Carolina, Orange County, and many other localities have declared states of emergency in response to the outbreak. Of the reported cases, 52 are in Orange County.  This interactive county map will be continually updated to show where coronavirus cases have been reported across the state. 


Central Prison pictured on March 30, 2020 in Raleigh, N.C.

State prisons prepare for continued COVID-19 spread, as first four cases are detected

The first four cases of COVID-19 in state prisons were announced on Thursday, two days after the North Carolina Department of Public Safety increased efforts to limit the spread of coronavirus in prisons. NCDPS first issued guidance on the virus in mid-March, but a coalition of advocates is calling on the department to do more to protect inmates. “We’ve known for awhile now that our prisons and jails across the state are particularly vulnerable to an outbreak of COVID-19,” Molly Rivera, a spokesperson for the American Civil Liberties Union of North Carolina, said. 


Rep. David Price, D-NC, celebrates his re-election at the election night party at the Democratic Headquarters in Raleigh on Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018. 

Here's what the third coronavirus relief package means for North Carolina

Some college students are concerned because they aren't specifically addressed in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act, the third federal bill addressing the COVID-19 crisis. Most Americans will receive direct checks for $1,200 — or $2,400 for married couples who jointly file tax returns — with an additional $500 for each child aged 17 and under. If a student is still considered a dependent on their parents' taxes, however, they will not receive a direct check themselves.


Charlotte City Workers Union organized a rally at City Hall on Monday, March 2, 2020. Speaking to the crowd is Dimple Ajmera, City Council member in support of Medicare for All, running for State Treasurer. Photo courtesy of Miranda Eltson. 

N.C. public service workers seek relief from officials as COVID-19 risks escalate

The expansion of COVID-19 continues raising risks for essential state employees, with the death of a Raleigh sanitation worker last week marking a new level of urgency. UE local 150 — a union representing North Carolina public service workers, including many at UNC — sent individual letters to Gov. Roy Cooper, Raleigh city leaders and the UNC System Board of Governors earlier this month.  The UE150 letters called on each authoritative body to implement new, "commonsense" measures that increase support for these workers, as the coronavirus shutters them off from working for needed wages and endangers them in their day-to-day duties. “Something like this kind of shows where there’s a lack of resources, supplies, a lack of personnel,” UE150 President Bryce Carter said, “so it brings those points out even more in these times.”