Brittany McGee

Articles

Central Prison pictured on March 30, 2020 in Raleigh, N.C.

State prisons prepare for continued COVID-19 spread, as first four cases are detected

The first four cases of COVID-19 in state prisons were announced on Thursday, two days after the North Carolina Department of Public Safety increased efforts to limit the spread of coronavirus in prisons. NCDPS first issued guidance on the virus in mid-March, but a coalition of advocates is calling on the department to do more to protect inmates. “We’ve known for awhile now that our prisons and jails across the state are particularly vulnerable to an outbreak of COVID-19,” Molly Rivera, a spokesperson for the American Civil Liberties Union of North Carolina, said. 



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The marker to the Chapel Hill Nine depicts the demonstrators on one side, along with their names and ages. The marker was dedicated on Friday, Feb. 28, 2020.

chapel hill nine

The marker to the Chapel Hill Nine depicts the demonstrators on one side, along with their names and ages. The marker was dedicated on Friday, Feb. 28, 2020.


Clayton Weaver is a Chapel Hill native who was 11 years old when the Chapel Hill Nine demonstrations began. He attended the marker dedication on Friday, Feb. 28, 2020.

Clayton Weaver

Clayton Weaver is a Chapel Hill native who was 11 years old when the Chapel Hill Nine demonstrations began. He attended the marker dedication on Friday, Feb. 28, 2020.


(From left) Surviving Chapel Hill Nine members Albert Williams and James Merritt, marker artist Steven Hayes, Chapel Hill Town Manager Maurice Jones, and two other Chapel Hill Nine members Dave Mason Jr. and 'Clyde' Douglas Perry stand behind the new marker on Franklin Street. The marker was dedicated on Friday, Feb. 28, 2020.

chapel hill nine

(From left) Surviving Chapel Hill Nine members Albert Williams and James Merritt, marker artist Steven Hayes, Chapel Hill Town Manager Maurice Jones, and two other Chapel Hill Nine members Dave Mason Jr. and 'Clyde' Douglas Perry stand behind the new marker on Franklin Street. The marker was dedicated on Friday, Feb. 28, 2020.


Chapel Hill Mayor Pam Hemminger spoke at the dedication of the Chapel Hill Nine marker on Friday, Feb. 28, 2020.

Pam Hemminger

Chapel Hill Mayor Pam Hemminger spoke at the dedication of the Chapel Hill Nine marker on Friday, Feb. 28, 2020.


Durham artist Stephen Hayes designed the marker commemorating the Chapel Hill Nine, a group of young men who organized a sit-in at the Colonial Drug Store on Franklin Street in 1960. The marker features images and headlines created following the sit-in. The marker was unveiled at a ceremony on Friday, Feb. 28, 2020. 

Marker Option

Durham artist Stephen Hayes designed the marker commemorating the Chapel Hill Nine, a group of young men who organized a sit-in at the Colonial Drug Store on Franklin Street in 1960. The marker features images and headlines created following the sit-in. The marker was unveiled at a ceremony on Friday, Feb. 28, 2020. 


Michael Foushee is a Chapel Hill native who was 6 years old when the Chapel Hill Nine demonstrations began. He attended the group's marker dedication event on Friday, Feb. 28, 2020.

Michael Foushee

Michael Foushee is a Chapel Hill native who was 6 years old when the Chapel Hill Nine demonstrations began. He attended the group's marker dedication event on Friday, Feb. 28, 2020.


James Merritt is one of the four surviving members of the Chapel Hill Nine. He attended the group's marker dedication event on Friday, Feb. 28, 2020.

James Merritt

James Merritt is one of the four surviving members of the Chapel Hill Nine. He attended the group's marker dedication event on Friday, Feb. 28, 2020.