Brittany McGee

Articles

An empty shelf of baby food, a Women, Infants and Children Program product, at Lowes Foods in Wilkes County, North Carolina. WIC products such as baby food have been selling out at increased rated due to the COVID-19 pandemic, putting WIC participants under extra duress.

Recipients of WIC program struggle to find approved food during pandemic

Policies regarding the Women, Infants and Children Program have been adjusted due to the COVID-19 pandemic as recipients of the program struggle to find approved foods. If grocery stores run out of the specific foods that WIC recipients are able to purchase, then they may leave empty handed. “We’re concerned about the ability for WIC participants to meet their nutritional needs during this time given the absence of many staple food items at many grocery stores,” Suzy Khachaturyan, a policy analyst with the N.C. Justice Center, said. 


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Data shows African Americans might be more affected by COVID-19 than other groups

A recent report released by the CDC implicated underlying conditions as being the main culprit for many COVID-19 deaths and also that African Americans made up a large number of hospitalizations. While local data is inconclusive for the moment, it does raise questions about how race and health are intertwined. “We cannot refer to these high rates of chronic disease without mentioning that African American communities also typically experience poverty, food deserts, gentrification, red-lining and environmental and systemic institutional racism at higher rates as well,” Kristin Prelipp, communications manager at the Orange County Health Department, said.


Chapel Ridge Apartments is an off-campus apartment complex where many UNC students live.

Students struggle to pay rent and negotiate leases due to economic impact of COVID-19

As the pandemic continues, it is becoming harder for students to keep up with housing payments. Some students have tried renegotiating their leases, but not all landlords have been willing to cooperate. Legal experts said landlords have different levels of flexibility, and may be unable to reduce rent or waive fees. However, they still encouraged students to discuss any issues with their landlords.


Central Prison pictured on March 30, 2020 in Raleigh, N.C. North Carolina prisons are facing challenges with containing COVID-19. 

State prisons prepare for continued COVID-19 spread, as first four cases are detected

The first four cases of COVID-19 in state prisons were announced on Thursday, two days after the North Carolina Department of Public Safety increased efforts to limit the spread of coronavirus in prisons. NCDPS first issued guidance on the virus in mid-March, but a coalition of advocates is calling on the department to do more to protect inmates. “We’ve known for awhile now that our prisons and jails across the state are particularly vulnerable to an outbreak of COVID-19,” Molly Rivera, a spokesperson for the American Civil Liberties Union of North Carolina, said. 



Media

The marker to the Chapel Hill Nine depicts the demonstrators on one side, along with their names and ages. The marker was dedicated on Friday, Feb. 28, 2020.

chapel hill nine

The marker to the Chapel Hill Nine depicts the demonstrators on one side, along with their names and ages. The marker was dedicated on Friday, Feb. 28, 2020.


Clayton Weaver is a Chapel Hill native who was 11 years old when the Chapel Hill Nine demonstrations began. He attended the marker dedication on Friday, Feb. 28, 2020.

Clayton Weaver

Clayton Weaver is a Chapel Hill native who was 11 years old when the Chapel Hill Nine demonstrations began. He attended the marker dedication on Friday, Feb. 28, 2020.


(From left) Surviving Chapel Hill Nine members Albert Williams and James Merritt, marker artist Steven Hayes, Chapel Hill Town Manager Maurice Jones, and two other Chapel Hill Nine members Dave Mason Jr. and 'Clyde' Douglas Perry stand behind the new marker on Franklin Street. The marker was dedicated on Friday, Feb. 28, 2020.

chapel hill nine

(From left) Surviving Chapel Hill Nine members Albert Williams and James Merritt, marker artist Steven Hayes, Chapel Hill Town Manager Maurice Jones, and two other Chapel Hill Nine members Dave Mason Jr. and 'Clyde' Douglas Perry stand behind the new marker on Franklin Street. The marker was dedicated on Friday, Feb. 28, 2020.


Chapel Hill Mayor Pam Hemminger spoke at the dedication of the Chapel Hill Nine marker on Friday, Feb. 28, 2020.

Pam Hemminger

Chapel Hill Mayor Pam Hemminger spoke at the dedication of the Chapel Hill Nine marker on Friday, Feb. 28, 2020.


Durham artist Stephen Hayes designed the marker commemorating the Chapel Hill Nine, a group of young men who organized a sit-in at the Colonial Drug Store on Franklin Street in 1960. The marker features images and headlines created following the sit-in. The marker was unveiled at a ceremony on Friday, Feb. 28, 2020. 

Marker Option

Durham artist Stephen Hayes designed the marker commemorating the Chapel Hill Nine, a group of young men who organized a sit-in at the Colonial Drug Store on Franklin Street in 1960. The marker features images and headlines created following the sit-in. The marker was unveiled at a ceremony on Friday, Feb. 28, 2020. 


Michael Foushee is a Chapel Hill native who was 6 years old when the Chapel Hill Nine demonstrations began. He attended the group's marker dedication event on Friday, Feb. 28, 2020.

Michael Foushee

Michael Foushee is a Chapel Hill native who was 6 years old when the Chapel Hill Nine demonstrations began. He attended the group's marker dedication event on Friday, Feb. 28, 2020.


James Merritt is one of the four surviving members of the Chapel Hill Nine. He attended the group's marker dedication event on Friday, Feb. 28, 2020.

James Merritt

James Merritt is one of the four surviving members of the Chapel Hill Nine. He attended the group's marker dedication event on Friday, Feb. 28, 2020.