Public school children protest passing the HB13 bill during a protest in Raleigh on April 19.

State Senate passes class size compromise bill

The N.C. Senate passed a compromise Tuesday to extend the deadline for schools to meet new class size requirements until fall 2018 — a year later than House Bill 13 had proposed. 


N.C. General Assembly

The N.C. General Assembly is the legislative body for the state of North Carolina. The general assembly is made up of two houses, the Senate and the House of Representatives. The legislative process works much like congress. A bill must be passed by both houses and is sent to the governor for approval before it becomes a law.

The general assembly has a direct effect on the University and how it runs. Every two years the assembly appropriates money for the UNC system in its biennial budget. During that time the budget for UNC-Chapel Hill is discussed and decided.

The first Republican majorities in both chambers of the legislature since 1898 were elected in the November 2010 general election, and they convened in January 2011.

The Daily Tar Heel tags stories to make it easier for you to find our more about topics you care about. Consider it a Wikipedia for all things UNC.


NCAA announces it will consider NC bids for championship sites

The NCAA Board of Governors announced Tuesday that it will consider North Carolina’s bids for championship sites — after a partial repeal of HB2 became law on Friday. During the legislative process, the NCAA said it did not lobby for any particular change. “The Board of Governors, however, was hopeful that the state would fully repeal HB2 in order to allow the host communities to ensure a safe, healthy, discrimination-free atmosphere for the championship sites,” the NCAA Board of Governors said in a press release. And the board remains concerned about the public perception of a moratorium on enacting or amending non-discrimination ordinances until December 2020 — which passed as a part of N.C.


Bill aims to allow guns in churches

A bill originally permitting gun owners to bring weapons to church services held in school buildings passed with a majority vote in the N.C. House March 27 and passed its first Senate reading the next day.