UNC goes to Washington: Graduates reflect on their paths to politics

Politicians like N.C. Gov. Roy Cooper and U.S. Rep. David Price, D-N.C., were involved in a variety of campus extracurriculars during their undergraduate careers at UNC, which set them on their political careers. 

“There’s no set pathway to get into any career, but especially with politics it’s so liquid to get to that point,”  UNC sophomore Serena Singh said. 

Singh, who was recently elected co-chairperson of Multicultural Affairs and Diversity Outreach Committee in the Undergraduate Executive Branch, said having political role models is beneficial because it shows you don’t have to go to law school to go into politics. 


Young Democrats

Young Democrats is one of UNC’s largest and most active student organizations, recently celebrating its 70th anniversary on campus.

The mission of this group is to engage college students in the political process, catalyze progressive activism and serve as a voice for college students within the Democratic Party. The Young Democrats host many events throughout the year, including guest speakers. Some include: Barack Obama, James Taylor, Chelsea Clinton, Bill Bradley and Kay Hagan.

The Young Democrats is separated into six committees: Activism, Campus Blueprint, Local Affairs, Political, Service, Wellstone and Fundraising.

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Jenny Wheeler

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