The Daily Tar Heel

Serving the students and the University community since 1893

Saturday July 2nd

Education


UNC Students walk on campus on Oct. 8 2021.

UNC to launch new IDEAs in Action curriculum in Fall 2022

Faculty Council approved the IDEAS in Action curriculum in spring 2019, and the University plans to launch it in fall 2022.  “We are moving away from this concept of checking off boxes and fulfilling requirements,” Nick Siedentop, curriculum director in the Office of Undergraduate Curricula, said.

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CHCCS English language learners' test scores drop 30.3 percent from pre-pandemic years

CHCCS recently released student proficiency data for standardized tests conducted in the 2020-21 school year.  The data showed that proficiency scores for students decreased significantly, particularly for English language learners, between 2018-19 and 2020-21, down 13.7 percent. “We don’t know what caused all the changes, and we didn't test all the children,” Diane Villwock, executive director of assessment and research at CHCCS, said. “So when we compare this to '18-'19, and we know the instruction was different, we've got to be really careful to not lean too hard on that comparison. It's not apples to apples.”

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Data from the 2019 to 2020 school year.

Decades after CHCCS desegregation, data shows racial disparities persist

This year marks 60 years since desegregation began in CHCCS. But even now, across the district’s 20 schools, white students access more opportunity and face less discipline than Black students, according to a Daily Tar Heel analysis of the most recently available federal, state and local data. Statewide, white children were 3.7 times more likely to be in a gifted program than their Black peers. At East Chapel Hill High School during the 2019-20 school year, white students were 4.3 times more likely to be enrolled in at least one Advanced Placement class than Black students. For nine of the 10 schools that reported short-term suspension rates for white and Black students, Black students were at least 11 times more likely to be suspended than white students. 

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Stan Vickers was the first Black student to attend a previously all-white school in Orange County. Vickers was honored by the Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools Board of Education on August 12 60 years after the court case that desegregated local schools.

CHCCS honors Stan Vickers after 60th anniversary of desegregation efforts

The CHCCS Board of Education honored Stan Vickers at a recent school board meeting for his contributions to the original desegregation movements in Orange County 60 years ago.  When Vickers was 10 years old, Vickers’ family filed a lawsuit against the Chapel Hill City Board of Education to gain entry into Carrboro Elementary School where, at the time, only white students were allowed to attend.  "Every child should have a right to a good education," Vickers said at a board meeting last week. "We have come a way, but there’s a long way to go."

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Denise Page poses for a virtual portrait inside her car on Tuesday 4, 2021. Page has her two children attend school virtually due to safety concerns involving the COVID-19 pandemic.

For some Black families in CHCCS, remote learning is a "breath of fresh air"

Courtney McLaughlin, mother of three CHCCS students, said some Black families have felt more included in their students’ education during remote learning.  Instead of teachers communicating less, she said her kids’ teachers have been communicating with her more than ever. “This is the first time a lot of Black families have had that experience of having, I guess, a little bit of power, and a little bit of say-so,” she said. “I know what my kids learn; I know how he’s being treated during the day. I can hear it in the next room.”

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