The Daily Tar Heel

Serving the students and the University community since 1893

Saturday May 28th

North Carolina Politics


DTH Photo Illustration. As the election approaches,  concerns have been raised about racial disparities among absentee ballot deficiency rates.

Higher rate of deficiencies reported in absentee ballots cast by Black voters in NC

As the election approaches, there have been concerns about racial disparities in absentee ballot deficiency rates.  The North Carolina State Board of Elections  reports that 3.5 percent of non-Hispanic Black voters and 2.6 percent of Hispanic voters have had their ballots deemed deficient, compared to one percent of non-Hispanic white voters. “I’m sure there are consequences of historical, systemic oppression that sort of plays into that as well in terms of just access to the ballots and familiarity with election procedures,” said Jeff Loperfido, senior counsel for voting rights at the Southern Coalition for Social Justice Voters can track the status of their mail-in ballots using BallotTrax. 

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Social justice activist Kerwin Pittman speaks out against police brutality in reponse to George Floyd's death at the #RaleighDemandsJustice protest in downtown Raleigh on Saturday, May 30, 2020. This Saturday, many local organizations came together to hold a non-violent protest in Raleigh in solidarity with the other protests happening across the country.

Protest over death of George Floyd escalates in Raleigh as police deploy tear gas

Thousands gathered in Raleigh this Saturday to peacefully protest. The next morning, downtown was decimated. After a peaceful protest that began around 5 p.m. and lasted for approximately two hours, tensions escalated through the night as police deployed tear gas and rubber bullets at demonstrators and multiple buildings were damaged in the aftermath.   

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Choose from elections for president, governor and general assembly to compare the vote shift between the 2012 and 2016 elections compared with U.S. Census demographics. 
Data source: U.S. Census Bureau, North Carolina State Board of Elections

'Living inside a bubble': How N.C. voters broke along lines of income and education

With competitive elections for nearly every office in the state on the ballot this fall, two counties on opposite sides of the state with differing population dynamics serve as examples of a greater statewide trend.  Between the 2012 and 2016 elections, North Carolina counties' vote shift tracked with their median income and education level u2014 counties with higher income and education levels tended to shift towards the Democratic Party and counties experiencing more poverty shifted their vote towards the Republican Party.

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