The Daily Tar Heel

Serving the students and the University community since 1893

Saturday May 28th

North Carolina Politics


Former Vice President Joe Biden speaks during a rally ahead of Super Tuesday at St. Augustine's University in Raleigh, on Saturday, Feb. 29, 2020. Later that day, Biden won the South Carolina primary.

After win in North Carolina, Biden looks to be the Democratic frontrunner

Joe Biden ran away with most of the Super Tuesday states, and he earned just about 43 percent of the vote in North Carolina. Despite his strong showing, the candidates didn't devote a lot of time to North Carolina compared to other more populous states. This is the earliest North Carolina has ever voted. While legislators hoped this would make the state more important on the national level, it also meant voters had less time to make a decision about who to vote for. 

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John Chandler, 58, of Chapel Hill, fills out his ballot for the local election at Chapel of the Cross on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Early voting for the Chapel Hill local election is available here on weekdays from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday, Oct. 27 from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Polls are closed in North Carolina. Here are the early results.

Polls for the North Carolina primary closed at 7:30 p.m. Early results indicate former Vice President Joe Biden will win the most votes for the Democratic presidential nomination. Primary races are also on the ballot for U.S. Senate, U.S. House, governor, and council of state. Winners of the Orange County Board of Commissioners and Orange County Schools Board of Education elections will assume their seats in June. This article will be updated as results continue to come in. 

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Gov. Roy Cooper stands before members of the media following a press conference introducing Well Dot Inc. to the Chapel Hill area on Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2019.

Battle to overturn 2016 limitations on governor’s power moves to N.C. Supreme Court

In Dec. 2016, a month before Roy Cooper took office, two laws were passed by Republicans that limited the governor's powers. By the end, the number of positions that worked directly for the governor was cut from 1,500 to 300, meaning those appointed to these positions by former Republican Gov. Pat McCrory would remain.  Now, a group of plaintiffs led by advocacy group Common Cause N.C. has appealed to the N.C. Supreme Court to overturn those laws.  But some experts say this claim is a long shot and would require a landmark ruling.

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