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Though Chapel Hill businesses see a decrease in revenue as students go home for winter break, it is mediated by an increase in patronage by local families.

As the stress of finals week concludes and UNC students leave town, Chapel Hill businesses will look to permanent residents to fill their shops and restaurants. 

Katie Loovis, vice president for external affairs at the Chapel Hill-Carrboro Chamber of Commerce, said the total economic impact of winter break is felt most strongly by restaurants and retail but is less extreme than one may think. 

Although roughly 30,000 students leave for the break, Loovis said many University faculty, hospital staff and international students stay in town, meaning Chapel Hill shops continue to serve a large customer base. 





Photo illustration. Local bartenders and bouncers are cracking down on fake IDs as ALE presence is rising. 

State and local ALE departments play different roles within the community

Only 109 agents of the State Bureau of Investigation are tasked with enforcing alcohol law in the 100 counties that make up North Carolina. Yet the presence of Alcohol Law Enforcement is strongly felt in Chapel Hill.  The state agency makes up for its relatively small size by forming partnerships with local police departments, sheriffs and district attorney's offices, ALE Special Agent in Charge Bryan House said.  “We work with stakeholders of all kinds to try and solve problems as they relate to alcohol and places that sell alcohol specifically whether they be legal or illegal,” he said. “Typically, what that looks like for us is we take an all-crimes approach as it relates to enforcement and that is at places that sell alcohol, specifically.”


Matthew Andrews, the Chiron Award winner, sits in his office covered in sports paraphernalia. Contrib/Photo Credit: Sarah Leck. 

Matthew Andrews hits a home run to win Chiron Award

If you were going to die tomorrow what would you talk about tonight? That’s the prompt given to the annual winner of the Chiron Award for their award lecture. The Chiron Award is given each year to a professor nominated by their students in recognition of their character and service to the undergraduate population. It was inspired by the last lecture of Randy Pausch, a professor at Carnegie-Mellon who had been diagnosed with terminal pancreatic cancer. 


Posters for "Carolina Nationalist Discord" were posted around campus, and taken down from Ehringhaus Residence Hall.

Poster advertising nationalist chat taken down

Flyers reading “Is it okay to be white? Have an open conversation about race. Join the Carolina Nationalist Discord.”  were posted at several locations around campus last week. They  advertised a chat room for students to discuss sensitive racial topics.